I’m Starting a Seed Library at My Library

This is the Press Release or this project. I will post more details for folks interested in starting one. But really, the best instructions for starting a seed library come from Richmond Grows. They have instructions, videos, and everything you need to put yours together.

Just as one seed can produce many seeds, one idea can change many lives. Free public libraries were revolutionary in their time because they provided access to books and knowledge that had not previously been available to a large segment of the population. A free seed lending library can also provide people with a chance to transform their lives and communities by providing access to fresh, healthy food that may not otherwise be available.

What is a Seed Library?
A seed library is a lot like a traditional library in a number of ways. Patrons of the seed library need to sign up, learn how to “check-out” seeds, and, of course, the library is free! The big difference is that instead of checking out books or DVDs like a traditional library, patrons can check out seeds to grow in their gardens at home. While, we don’t expect anyone to return the seeds to the library, we do hope that the residents of East Palo Alto learn to grow and share their fresh fruits and vegetables.

How Did it Start?
The East Palo Alto Seed Library began as an idea spurred by the Richmond Grows Seed Library at the Richmond Public Library. You can check this library out at www.richmondgrows.org. The EPA Library partnered with a great local non-profit called Collective Roots to bring a similar idea to the residents of EPA.

Who is Our Great Partner?
Collective Roots is a local non-profit that “seeks to educate and engage youth and communities in food system change through sustainable programs that impact health, education, and the environment.” This group is also responsible for the East Palo Alto Farmer’s Market that is held every Saturday from 2-5pm in front of the EPA YMCA. They also work with youth and adults to design and sustain organic gardens on school and community sites that are linked with kindergarten through 12th grade curriculum provided by Collective Roots.

The East Palo Alto Seed Library will be open to everyone starting April 22nd. It will provide, in addition to seeds, education about growing healthy and sustainable foods and gardens. The Seed Library is open to all residents of East Palo Alto, with no charge. It is maintained by EPA Library staff, Collective Roots, volunteers, and supported by donations.



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About pcsweeney

Currently, I'm the Branch Manager of the East Palo Alto Library in California. If you find yourself to be extremely bored (and would like to be more bored) you can find all of my internet mind droppings about libraries by googling pcsweeney.
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9 Responses to I’m Starting a Seed Library at My Library

  1. rahma krambo says:

    I had not heard of a seed library being incorporated into a book library, but I absolutely love the idea! I’m going to pass this on to our Friends of the Library.

  2. Doris Madsen says:

    great idea – am starting one tomorrow at my library branch in Springfield, MA. wonderful. thanks for the tip!

  3. super great post about a super inspired project! the world needs more seed libraries, and public libraries are the perfect spots to house them. nice work!

  4. Pingback: Partnerships = Library Awesome! « PC Sweeney's Blog

  5. Cally says:

    this is great, I’d love to see the idea spread everywhere. at the moment I hang little packets of collected seeds on my gate post for people to take when they pass. For years I never knew who had any but recently met a sweet old lady who said she’d had lots, as well as my bags of divided plants, and that her garden was full of colour now. Made me really happy to know that my little patch moved out into the wider world at no cost to anyone.

  6. Pingback: Swiss Army Librarian » #PLA12 Redefining the Library through the Collection :: Brian Herzog

  7. Pingback: Weird collecting | JANINEVEAZUE

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